How to make this essay shorter?

by admin on October 2, 2010

It needs to be 1 page long double spaced in Microsoft word

At a first glance at the title of this book, A Single Shard by Linda Sue Park, I assumed it would be about pottery, but this book had a deeper meaning than what I had assumed. Set in the twelfth century, Tree-ear, the main character of the book, is an orphan and lives under a bridge with Crane-man. Tree-ear is captivated by pottery and watches the potter Min create his celadon pottery every day. One day, Tree-ear accidentally breaks one of Min’s pots, so Tree-ear works for Min to pay off the dept. After Tree-ear had worked off his debt, Tree-ear asked to work for Min, in hopes of learning how to create pots. Min accepts the offer, but does not teach Tree-ear how to pot. Eventually, news spreads that the royal emissary is on a tour to assign royal commissions for the palace. This is every potter’s dream to be assigned a royal commission. On the way to Min’s house one day, Tree-ear sees Kang, a rival potter, working on something secretively. Tree-ear peeks into Kang’s workplace and is troubled about whether he should tell Min about Kang’s innovative idea. Tree-ear decides not to, and Kang gets a lot of attention from the emissary. After the emissary leaves, Tree-ear decides that it would not be wrong to tell Min of Kang’s idea, since Kang had publicly shown his work. Min immediately sets to work on new pots, but they are ruined due to oxidation. The emissary gives Min a second chance to bring his work to the city of Songdo, where he will inspect it. Min cannot walk to Songdo, being an old man, but Tree-ear offers to deliver the vases to Songdo. On his journey to Songdo, Tree-ear decides to visit a national landmark on the recommendation of Crane-man, only to get his vases smashed by robbers. In the aftermath, instead of returning home, Tree-ear decides to take a shard of the broken work and deliver it to Songdo. When Emissary Kim sees the shard, he is impressed by he work and gives Min a royal commission. Overjoyed, Tree-ear returns home quickly, only to find that Crane-man had died in an accident and that Min was willing to adopt Tree-ear. Tree-ear is obviously saddened that Crane-man died, but cheers up when Min decides to teach Tree-ear about pottery. At the end of the book, Tree-ear is left wondering about the perfect design for a vase.

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{ 1 comment }

Lindsay October 2, 2010 at 7:23 am

At a first I assumed, A Single Shard by Linda Sue Park, would be about pottery, but this book had a deeper meaning. Set in the twelfth century, Tree-ear, the main character, is an orphan and lives under a bridge with Crane-man. Tree-ear is captivated by pottery and watches the potter Min create his celadon pottery every day. One day, Tree-ear accidentally breaks one of Min’s pots, so he works for Min to pay off the dept. After Tree-ear had worked off his debt, he asked to work for Min, in hopes of learning how to create pots. Min accepts the offer, but does not teach Tree-ear how to pot. Eventually, news spreads that the royal emissary is on a tour to assign royal commissions for the palace. This is every potter’s dream to be assigned a royal commission. On the way to Min’s house one day, Tree-ear sees Kang, a rival potter, working on something secretively. Tree-ear peeks into Kang’s workplace and is troubled about whether he should tell Min about Kang’s innovative idea. Tree-ear decides not to, and Kang gets a lot of attention from the emissary. After the emissary leaves, Tree-ear decides to tell Min of Kang’s idea, since Kang had publicly shown his work. Min immediately works on new pots, but they are ruined due to oxidation. The emissary gives Min a second chance to bring his work to the city of Songdo, where he will inspect it. Min cannot walk to Songdo, being an old man, and Tree-ear offers to deliver the vases. On his journey, Tree-ear visits a national landmark, only to have the vases smashed by robbers. Instead of returning home, Tree-ear takes a shard of a vase and deliver it to Songdo. When Emissary Kim sees the shard, he is impressed by the work and gives Min a royal commission. Overjoyed, Tree-ear returns home quickly, only to find that Crane-man had died. Min adopts Tree-ear and teaches him about pottery. At the end, Tree-ear is left wondering about the perfect design for a vase.

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